Search Results for

21-30 of 139

Resource: Predictors of breast milk substitute feeding among newborns in delivery facilities in urban Cambodia and Nepal

This article was published in the Maternal & Child Nutrition Supplement: Marketing and Consumption of Commercial Foods Fed to Young Children in Low and Middle‐income Countries. Abstract: Introducing breast milk substitutes (BMS) in the first days after birth can increase infant morbidity and reduce duration and exclusivity of breastfeeding. This study assessed determinants of BMS…

Resource: Prevalence, duration, and content of television advertisements for breast milk substitutes and commercially produced complementary foods in Phnom Penh, Cambodia and Dakar, Senegal

This article was published in the Maternal & Child Nutrition Supplement: Marketing and Consumption of Commercial Foods Fed to Young Children in Low and Middle‐income Countries. Abstract: Promotion of breast milk substitutes (BMS) and inappropriate marketing of commercially produced complementary foods (CPCF), including through television, can negatively influence infant and young child feeding. The World…

Resource: Marketing and infant and young child feeding in rapidly evolving food environments

This supplement editorial was published in the Maternal & Child Nutrition Supplement: Marketing and Consumption of Commercial Foods Fed to Young Children in Low and Middle‐income Countries. Excerpt: This 2019 Maternal & Child Nutrition supplement presents the continuation of research in Cambodia, Nepal, and Senegal, as well as a broadening of its scope in a new…

Post: New peer-reviewed articles on consumption and promotion of commercial foods

New research published by Helen Keller International’s Assessment and Research on Child Feeding (ARCH) Project in the scientific journal Maternal & Child Nutrition builds on previous findings on promotion and consumption of commercial foods and beverages among infants and young children. These papers illustrate the widespread promotion and high rates of consumption in Nepal, Cambodia,…

Resource: ARCH Project Summary: Focus and Approach

This brief outlines the current focus areas and advocacy approach of Helen Keller International’s Assessment & Research on Child Feeding (ARCH) Project. Suggested citation:  Helen Keller International. (2019). ARCH Assessment & Research on Child Feeding Summary. Helen Keller International, Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Click the “View Resource” button below to access the full brief.

Resource: Perceptions, Factors, and Impact of Unhealthy Snack Foods and Beverages during the Complementary Feeding Period in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal

This research brief discusses our recent work evaluating consumption of unhealthy snack foods and beverages among children 12-23 months of age in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. Key Findings: Children in Kathmandu Valley are consuming commercially produced snack foods and beverages at a high rate, the majority of which are “unhealthy” according to their nutrient profile. Despite…

Post: Efforts to Protect the Health and Growth of Cambodian Children: Enforcement of Sub-Decree 133

Sub-Decree 133 incorporates provisions of the International Code of Marketing of Breast-Milk Substitutes into national regulations in Cambodia. Recently, the Executive Working Group (EWG) in charge of implementation took a major step in ensuring that caregivers are protected against unethical marketing of breastmilk substitutes: The EWG fined two companies 2,500,000 Riels (625 USD) each for…

Post: Sharing ARCH Results in Bandung City, Indonesia

The ARCH Indonesia team continues to disseminate results of recent research to high-level officials in Bandung City. Bandung City, the capital of West Java Province, was the site of two studies into infant and young child feeding practices and marketing of commercial foods conducted by the ARCH Project from 2017-2018. Findings will be published in…