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Resource: Commercially produced complementary foods in Bandung City, Indonesia, are often reported to be iron fortified but with less than recommended amounts or suboptimal forms of iron

This article was published in the Maternal & Child Nutrition Supplement: Marketing and Consumption of Commercial Foods Fed to Young Children in Low and Middle‐income Countries. Access abstract in Bahasa Indonesia and French. Abstract: Commercially produced complementary foods (CPCF) that are iron fortified can help improve iron status of young children. We conducted a review…

Resource: Promotions of breastmilk substitutes, commercial complementary foods and commercial snack products commonly fed to young children are frequently found in points‐of‐sale in Bandung City, Indonesia

This article was published in the Maternal & Child Nutrition Supplement: Marketing and Consumption of Commercial Foods Fed to Young Children in Low and Middle‐income Countries. Abstract: Few studies have documented the marketing of commercial foods and beverages for infants and young children in West Java, Indonesia. To assess the prevalence of promotions at points‐of‐sale…

Resource: Pilot implementation of a monitoring and enforcement system for the International Code of Marketing of Breast‐milk Substitutes in Cambodia

This article was published in the Maternal & Child Nutrition Supplement: Marketing and Consumption of Commercial Foods Fed to Young Children in Low and Middle‐income Countries. Access abstract in Khmer and French. Abstract: Globally, monitoring and enforcement mechanisms for the World Health Organization’s International Code of Marketing of Breast‐milk Substitutes are often lacking. The Cambodian…

Resource: Predictors of breast milk substitute feeding among newborns in delivery facilities in urban Cambodia and Nepal

This article was published in the Maternal & Child Nutrition Supplement: Marketing and Consumption of Commercial Foods Fed to Young Children in Low and Middle‐income Countries. Access abstract in Khmer and French. Abstract: Introducing breast milk substitutes (BMS) in the first days after birth can increase infant morbidity and reduce duration and exclusivity of breastfeeding.…

Resource: Prevalence, duration, and content of television advertisements for breast milk substitutes and commercially produced complementary foods in Phnom Penh, Cambodia and Dakar, Senegal

This article was published in the Maternal & Child Nutrition Supplement: Marketing and Consumption of Commercial Foods Fed to Young Children in Low and Middle‐income Countries. Access abstract in Khmer and French. Abstract: Promotion of breast milk substitutes (BMS) and inappropriate marketing of commercially produced complementary foods (CPCF), including through television, can negatively influence infant…

Resource: Marketing and infant and young child feeding in rapidly evolving food environments

This supplement editorial was published in the Maternal & Child Nutrition Supplement: Marketing and Consumption of Commercial Foods Fed to Young Children in Low and Middle‐income Countries. Excerpt: This 2019 Maternal & Child Nutrition supplement presents the continuation of research in Cambodia, Nepal, and Senegal, as well as a broadening of its scope in a new…

Post: New peer-reviewed articles on consumption and promotion of commercial foods

New research published by Helen Keller International’s Assessment and Research on Child Feeding (ARCH) Project in the scientific journal Maternal & Child Nutrition builds on previous findings on promotion and consumption of commercial foods and beverages among infants and young children. These papers illustrate the widespread promotion and high rates of consumption in Nepal, Cambodia,…

Resource: ARCH Project Summary: Focus and Approach

This brief outlines the current focus areas and advocacy approach of Helen Keller International’s Assessment & Research on Child Feeding (ARCH) Project. Suggested citation:  Helen Keller International. (2019). ARCH Assessment & Research on Child Feeding Summary. Helen Keller International, Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Click the “View Resource” button below to access the full brief.